Our Drone Filled Future

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Our Drone Filled Future

Even as the print was hitting the paper, the statistics referenced in Economist article aptly titled “Welcome to the Drone Age” became inaccurate, or at the very least, disputable. The Economist references over 1 million drones being sold “around the world,” now, according the the FAA, we should sell that many in the US during the upcoming holiday season alone.

The scale and scope of the revolution in the use of small, civilian drones has caught many by surprise. In 2010 America’s Federal Aviation Authority (FAA) estimated that there would, by 2020, be perhaps 15,000 such drones in the country. More than that number are now sold there every month. And it is not just an American craze. Some analysts think the number of drones made and sold around the world this year will exceed 1m. In their view, what is now happening to drones is similar to what happened to personal computers in the 1980s, when Apple launched the Macintosh and IBM the PS/2, and such machines went from being hobbyists’ toys to business essentials.

Welcome to the Drone Age

The author of the article takes the position that while drones may be impactful, that they can’t be compared to personal computers. While it’s easier and more obvious to see the impact that personal computers have had (hindsight being 20/20 and all), one shouldn’t discount the future impact drones will have.

That is probably an exaggeration. It is hard to think of a business which could not benefit from a PC, whereas many may not benefit (at least directly) from drones. But the practical use of these small, remote-controlled aircraft is expanding rapidly.

Welcome to the Drone Age

As drone technology continues to evolve, new applications will evolve too. This pattern existed with personal computers, too. Drones technology is still in its infancy, which makes all of the existing applications even that more amazing.

After dragging its feet for several years the FAA had, by August, approved more than 1,000 commercial drone operations. These involved areas as diverse as agriculture (farmers use drones to monitor crop growth, insect infestations and areas in need of watering at a fraction of the cost of manned aerial surveys); land-surveying; film-making (some of the spectacular footage in “Avengers: Age of Ultron” was shot from a drone, which could fly lower and thus collect more dramatic pictures than a helicopter); security; and delivering things (Swiss Post has a trial drone-borne parcel service for packages weighing up to 1kg, and many others, including Amazon, UPS and Google, are looking at similar ideas).

Welcome to the Drone Age

Keeping with the computer analogy, I’d argue that current consumer drones we fly today are like “Commodore 64s.” I can’t wait until we reach the “MacBook Air” stage. The good news is that drone technology is evolving fast.

By | 2017-08-31T15:24:10+00:00 October 8th, 2015|Drones, Opinion|Comments Off on Our Drone Filled Future

About the Author:

Sam Estrin
I'm an avid drone enthusiast and part-time drone blogger living in Southern California. I write drone news stories as well as collect drone news stories that I find interesting and add my own thoughts and opinions. If you like my stories, you can follow me on Twitter or visit me at LinkedIn. If you'd like me to write for your drone oriented publication or blog, you can contact me at info@droneuniversities.com.