Too Many CA Firefighter vs. Drone Incidents Leads To Proposed Legislation

///Too Many CA Firefighter vs. Drone Incidents Leads To Proposed Legislation

Too Many CA Firefighter vs. Drone Incidents Leads To Proposed Legislation

Assemblyman Mike Gatto (D-Glendale)

Assemblyman Mike Gatto (D-Glendale)

New drone specific legislation in California is being proposed by Assemblyman Mike Gatto (D-Glendale) and state Sen. Ted Gaines (R-Rocklin). The legislation, specifically Senate Bill 168, indemnifies any and all emergency personnel who would take action against someone’s privately owned drone.

“We don’t imagine someone shooting it out of the sky,” said Assemblyman Mike Gatto (D-Glendale), one of the authors of the legislation. “Yet the existing law is insufficient to provide law enforcement that clear authority to take it down.”

Firefighters Could Destroy Nearby Drones Under Proposed State Law

State Sen. Ted Gaines (R-Rocklin)

State Sen. Ted Gaines (R-Rocklin)

Education or Legislation? What is the best solution? While I might not agree with the strategies employed by Gatto and Gaines, I can agree with Gaines on some points.

“People can replace drones but we can’t replace a life,” said Gaines in an emailed statement. “When our rescuers are risking their own lives to protect us, I want them thinking about safety, not liability.”

Firefighters Could Destroy Nearby Drones Under Proposed State Law

About California

California is a state located on the West Coast of the United States. It is themost populous U.S. state, with 38 million people, and the third largest state by area (after Alaska and Texas). California is bordered by Oregon to the north, Nevada to the east, Arizona to the southeast, and the Mexican state of Baja California to the south. It contains the nation’s second most populous census statistical area (Greater Los Angeles Area) and the fifth most populous (San Francisco Bay Area), and eight of the nation’s 50 most populated cities (Los Angeles, San Diego, San Jose, San Francisco, Fresno, Sacramento, Long Beach, andOakland). Sacramento has been the state capital since 1854.

By | 2017-08-31T15:24:33+00:00 September 2nd, 2015|Drone Law, Drones|1 Comment

About the Author:

Michael Robbins
Mr. Michael Robbins, who resides in Northern California, is our drone tech expert with over 30 years of experience. He started his career building gas powered UAVs at age 12. He has since earned a Bachelor's of Science degree in Design and Engineering and is AutoCAD certified. He has worked with the Monterey Bay Aquarium, Animal Planet, Travel Channel, Hearst Castle, CNN, Adobe, Oracle, HP, Cisco Systems, Discovery Channel, National Geographic and NASA. With a passion for aviation, Mr. Robbins spends his spare time studying for his Commercial Pilot’s License.

One Comment

  1. Matthew Elyash September 4, 2015 at 8:02 am

    While I can understand the sentiment, and like most people who fly both model aircraft and sUAS platforms would like to get our hands on the fools who continue to fly near active fire areas, there is a problem here when you start getting into house fires, and other responses where a sUAV either privately owned or belonging to a news agency may be in attendance. If the drone is in a hover, a safe distance away from the fire, does this give the firefighters the right to hose it down or use some other means to destroy it? What about a traffic accident, No life flight involved, drone hovering back and away from people and firefighters? A drone can give perspective that investigators could use to help in their work. I am worried that this makes it open season on Drones and their owners.

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